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Utilising AI to revolutionise Employee Engagement

As the tech landscape continues to evolve at pace, companies are increasingly turning to artificial intelligence (AI) to enhance employee engagement (EE) and create more dynamic and personalised work environments.

Sounds great – ask ChatGPT to come up with an Employee Engagement strategy, which you or one of your colleagues can implement at the next Team meeting, sit back, and watch your EE levels soar.

If only it was that easy…

Serious consideration needs to be given to given to using AI before embarking on its use; such as deciding whether or not to invest in an EE-specific platform, and even more critically, working out how to align it with the broader HR strategy of your company.

Another fundamental aspect of leveraging AI for EE is understanding that it’s not a one-size-fits-all solution.

A strategic approach involves tailoring AI applications to align seamlessly with the unique culture and goals of your organisation. For example, if fostering collaboration is a priority, AI tools can be designed to enhance team communication and project management – reinforcing the company’s overall engagement goals.

Implementing AI solutions is just the first step; companies need to establish feedback loops and regularly assess the impact of these technologies on EE. This ongoing evaluation allows organisations to make necessary adjustments, ensuring that AI applications are evolving in tandem with the changing needs and expectations of the workforce.

It also needs to be remembered that EE is not a static metric; it requires ownership within the business, providing continuous attention and adaptation. This is where the importance of follow-up mechanisms comes into play, along with the ability to measure the impact of the changes you are implementing.

One way AI can significantly contribute to EE is through personalised experiences. Unlike generic, one-size-fits-all approaches, AI can analyse vast amounts of data to create tailored employee interactions. For instance, AI platforms can provide customised learning and development recommendations based on an employee’s strengths, weaknesses, and career aspirations. Not only does this foster skills development, but it also demonstrates your commitment to the professional growth of your team.

Another area where AI can make a tangible impact is in the realm of performance management. Traditionally, annual performance reviews have been the norm, often leaving employees feeling disconnected and undervalued. AI can transform this process by providing real-time feedback and performance insights. Through continuous monitoring, AI tools can offer constructive feedback, helping employees stay on track with their goals and fostering a culture of accountability.

Moreover, AI can play a pivotal role in streamlining administrative tasks, freeing up valuable time for employees to focus on more meaningful and fulfilling aspects of their work. Automating routine HR processes, such as leave management and expense tracking, not only reduces the burden on employees but also contributes to a more efficient and agile workplace – which in turn can positively influence job satisfaction and overall engagement levels.

However, it’s essential to strike a balance between automation and the human touch. While AI can handle routine tasks effectively, the human element remains crucial in more complex and emotionally charged situations. This underscores the need for a thoughtful and intentional integration of AI into the HR strategy.

“Approach employees as true partners, involving them in continuous dialogues and processes about how to design and alter their roles, tasks and working relationships—which means that leaders need to make it safe enough for employees to speak openly of their experiences at work.”
William Kahn, Organisational Psychologist.

The strategic integration of AI has the potential to revolutionise EE. The key lies in aligning your AI toolkit with your broader HR strategy, ensuring a seamless fit that enhances rather than disrupts the existing work culture. Continuous evaluation and follow-up mechanisms are critical to fine-tuning your AI solutions, making them adaptive to the evolving needs of your workforce. As businesses navigate the complexities of the modern workplace, embracing AI thoughtfully and strategically can be a game-changer in fostering a more engaged and motivated workforce.

 

Written by Ian Weatherup


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How to improve your employee retention

Work is a huge part of our lives, so we should enjoy what we do. Therefore, it’s no surprise that people who dislike their job or feel dissatisfied with what they’re doing, won’t stick around for long.

Working to improve staff retention rates and keeping talented team members should always be a business priority. Low staff turnover means less time and money spent on recruitment; it also helps to build a strong employer brand, increasing your candidate attraction.

So, how can you improve employee retention and set your business apart from your competitors?

Hire the right fit

This might sound obvious, but the foundation of staff retention starts with hiring employees who align with your company’s values, culture, and job requirements. In terms of how we approach recruitment at Corvus People, we conduct thorough interviews and assessments to ensure that candidates not only have the necessary skills, but also show the right attitude, behaviours, and enthusiasm for the role and our own or our client’s organisation.

Have a clear onboarding process

A structured and comprehensive onboarding process can set the tone for your employee’s tenure. It helps to provide new employees with a warm welcome, an introduction to company policies, and a clear understanding of their roles and responsibilities. This in turn will help them feel valued and confident in their new position.

Communicate effectively

Communication is important in any business, and it’s clear that employees favour an open and honest working environment. Clear communication is essential in the workplace; especially if you want to build trust and ensure you have a positive company culture. Managers play an important part in this and businesses should equip them with the resources they need to deal with any issues effectively.

This helps staff feel supported in their role and improves staff retention rates. Employees appreciate feeling listened to by their managers and will ultimately feel happier in their jobs.

Encourage a good work-life balance

Poor work-life balance can lead to stress, burnout, and ultimately exits within your team. It’s important to consider your employees’ well-being and encourage a good balance across your business.

Some ideas could be to:

  • Provide flexible and remote working options
  • Encourage managers to focus on productivity rather than hours
  • Encourage breaks
  • Regularly review workloads
  • Give employees time to volunteer
  • Increase support for parents

There are many ways to prevent stress and burnout in employees, it can be as simple as insisting that employees take their full lunch break and leave the office at a reasonable time. Not only does it help your staff, but it also increases their productivity when they’re in the office.

Offer development opportunities

Career progression is a priority for the majority of professionals and a lack of development opportunities can lead to disengagement. As an employer, you should take the lead on this from day one. Work with your employees to decide on a clear career development path, and catch up with them regularly to check their progress. This could consist of monthly, quarterly, and yearly 1-2-1 meetings. This will help improve staff retention as you’ll ensure you’re giving your team members added responsibilities as they develop. As a result, they’ll feel confident that they can advance in the business and have influence within your organisation.

Praise and reward

Recognising hard work and showing staff that you appreciate their efforts is vital to improving retention rates in your company. One way to do this is to implement a monthly incentive scheme. For example, this could include crowning a ‘team member of the month’, where a small prize or bonus is given to the deserving winner, boosting morale and helping to make employees feel appreciated.

Ensure you are keeping up with average pay in your industry; if what you’re offering doesn’t meet this then your employees may go looking elsewhere. Don’t worry if you can’t offer the most competitive salary, there are other rewards and benefits that you might be able to provide, work life balance goes a long way in creating a desired work environment.

There are many ways to improve staff retention in your company and recognising that employees play a crucial role in your businesses’ success is a great start. By treating your staff well; and looking out for their best interests is a surefire way to ensure they don’t look elsewhere for a better opportunity.

Written by Helen Cosgrove


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Fair Pay – a catalyst for employee retention and company growth

Fair pay is essential to foster lasting success and growth within your company. When employees are compensated equitably for their contributions, you will spark a sense of motivation and commitment within your teams. This builds trust and loyalty between your workforce and organisation. Fair pay can be more than just a financial transaction – you can leverage it to create a thriving environment where the individuals and the company flourish together.

The link between fair pay, retention, and growth isn’t just anecdotal – it’s backed by data. Studies consistently reveal that companies prioritising fair compensation outperform their peers in terms of revenue growth and profitability. A motivated, committed, and stable workforce fuels innovation, customer satisfaction, and ultimately, the bottom line.

Fair compensation practices don’t just impact the internal dynamics but also shape the company’s external image. Demonstrating commitment to fair pay creates a positive reputation, attracting top-tier talent in a competitive job market. It also nurtures a culture of trust between employers and employees, creating stronger long-term relationships.

More often than not, companies aren’t paying unfairly on purpose. It is a byproduct of neglecting salary research and reviews within their people management process. However, we recognise that it is challenging to exactly define what constitutes fair pay. Some considerations include:

  • Job responsibilities and skills
  • Salaries internally for similar roles
  • Market conditions
  • Company size and industry
  • Geographic location
  • Experience and seniority
  • Other benefits within the package

It usually happens one of two ways when an employer finds themselves with inequitable pay in their business.

  1. They are hiring in line with industry standards or based on the individual’s last role but aren’t reviewing existing staff to keep them at this rate.
  2. They are hiring at the rate of their existing staff, but these aren’t being brought in line with industry standards.

Every business feels the effect of inflation and other economic pressures. So do their teams. Salaries should be reviewed regularly and increased in line with external factors to keep staff on a like-for-like pay scale. Creating pay bands is also a fair and objective way of ensuring salaries align with the role and means that people have an opportunity to develop and grow in their current position, without having to look to the next promotion as a key milestone for a pay increase.

Increasing your teams pay may seem like a cost to your business, but the long-term benefits usually outweigh the initial sting. When employees feel that their compensation aligns with their responsibilities and the market standards, they are less likely to seek opportunities elsewhere. This reduction in turnover translates to substantial cost savings associated with recruitment, onboarding, and training, while also nurturing a stable and experienced workforce.

As priorities amongst candidates continue to evolve, the spotlight on pay equity will remain crucial. Organisations that prioritise fair compensation, diversity, and inclusion are better positioned to create an environment that fosters innovation, collaboration, and sustainable success. It’s an ongoing journey that requires vigilance, self-assessment, and a commitment to creating workplaces that reflect our highest values.

Need help making sure your salaries are working for your team as well as your business? Get in touch today at [email protected].

 

Written by Charlene Craig


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Process Improvement: How can you recruit like MAMAA*?

If you haven’t heard of MAMAA*, you may have heard of FAANG – Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix, and Google. MAMAA is an acronym coined by Jim Cramer and stands for Meta, Apple, Microsoft, Amazon and Alphabet, the largest tech companies on the S&P 500 index.  

Growing businesses are always looking for ways to improve business processes and find efficiencies. One area that is often lacking is an intentional and well-thought-out recruitment process.

Better hiring is the secret sauce to the world’s most successful companies. I recently spoke to an ex-McKinsey & Company Engagement Manager and asked them, “What is McKinsey’s secret to success?”. Their answer was, “They make fewer hiring mistakes, and when they do, they rectify them quickly”. 

Steve Jobs had a saying: “A players hire A players. But B players hire C players, and C players hire D players. It doesn’t take long to get to Z players”. High-calibre talent can propel your business to new heights, you just need proper processes to identify, attract and retain them.

Most of the time, interviews are conducted by people who’ve had no formal training in effective interview methods. They learn through trial and error or from people who themselves have learnt through trial and error. I wouldn’t want to guess how often Google is used to compile a list of interview questions – so I won’t.

And it’s not just me on my pedestal talking about this – it’s proven that a more structured approach yields better results:

  • A study by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) found that only 14% of employers in the UK believe that non-structured interviews are an effective way to assess candidates.
  • Another study by the University of Warwick found that non-structured interviews are only 10% as effective as structured interviews in predicting job performance.
  • A third study by the Recruitment & Employment Confederation (REC) found that 60% of employers in the UK have made a bad hiring decision because of using a non-structured interview process.

So, how do you create better interview processes? To start, you need to create a scorecard. To define your scorecard, you should consider:

  • Mission: What is the purpose of the role?
  • Outcomes: What key results must the person in this role deliver?
  • Competencies: What are the must-have skills, behaviours, and attitudes of the person in this role?
  • Evidence: What specific examples of past behaviour demonstrate that the candidate has the skills, behaviours, and attitudes needed for the role? 

One of the most effective methods for hiring critical hires is the ghSMART “Who” method. The “Who” method is a structured interview process that focuses on identifying the candidate’s character and fit for the role. The method is based on the idea that the best predictor of future performance is past behaviour. It has a 90% success rate. 

The “Who” method consists of five steps: 

  • The Screening Interview: This is a brief phone interview to assess the candidate’s basic qualifications. 
  • The Who Interview: This is a detailed interview that focuses on the candidate’s character and fit for the role. The interviewer asks the candidate questions about their past experiences, challenges, and successes. 
  • The Focused Interview: This interview is designed to gather additional information about the candidate’s skills and experience. 
  • The Reference Check: This is a check of the candidate’s references to verify their qualifications and character. 
  • The Skill-Will Bull’s-Eye: This is a final assessment of the candidate’s skills and will to succeed in the role. 

By following this method, you can increase your chances of finding the right person for the job and avoid making costly mistakes. 

Here are some additional tips for using the ghSMART “Who” method: 

  • Be prepared: Before you conduct the interview, take some time to learn about the candidate’s background and experience. This will help you to ask more informed questions. 
  • Be objective: Avoid making hiring decisions based on gut feeling or personal bias. Use the “Who” method to assess the candidate’s true fit for the role. 
  • Give candidates feedback: Whether you decide to hire the candidate or not, it is important to give them feedback on their interview performance. This will help them to improve their interviewing skills and increase their chances of getting hired in the future. 

If you’d like to partner with a business that can do all the above and more, we can help. Get in touch for a free consultation at [email protected]. 

 

Written by Michael Hewitt


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Are you considering the wider impact of the skills shortage?

Hiring isn’t easy. It’s time intensive, but it’s high-value work. If you spend the time to hire the right people, your business will grow.

I am not professing to be a business guru, but I have been exposed to enough podcasts, books, and real-life experiences to form an opinion.

The leaders who have hiring on their priority list, who give HR and recruitment a seat at the table, are the ones who grow most sustainably.

Businesses often stop at ‘it’s hard to hire’ and don’t dig much deeper into how these skill shortages impact their business – not just from a retention standpoint, but also from an output, profitability, and growth perspective.

The Open University recently released the results of an NI business survey. It noted that 83% of organisations agree they are currently facing skills shortages.

The survey went on to show that 75% of organisations found that these skills shortages had caused an increase in workload for other staff. This increased pressure on your existing teams creates a vicious circle – you lose a key player, pressure increases on the existing team, they become unhappy and leave, and you’re left with an even bigger gap in your talent pool. And so, it continues. 

If your team members are consistently under extra pressure without reward or recognition, they will inevitably seek a role that pays them their worth. It exacerbates the challenges with recruitment because it means that instead of hiring for growth, you’ll be hiring to replace lost talent.

More worryingly, the survey also found that 82% of businesses had experienced reduced output, profitability, or growth. Of course, this is not all because of the skills shortage – inflation is also a contributory factor. The cost of business is going up, so it’s normal for this to impact your bottom line. But while it can’t all be attributed to the skills shortage, it does have a big part to play. When you don’t have a team with the right skills, it takes a lot longer to get a lot less done, having a knock-on effect on your profit and output. 

These stats highlight that it is more important than ever for businesses to start managing their talent effectively if they hope to grow. Businesses need to be intentional in how they are forecasting, attracting, and retaining their talent.

The first step in tackling these issues would be diagnosing any existing challenges through stay interviews or similar techniques and starting to map your existing talent to identify skills gaps. These exercises will give you a real-time view of the situation, allowing you to deal with these problems before it is too late. 

Once you are clear on your current position, it is time to review your employer brand. How do you attract the best talent to join your business? What is your market reputation? What makes you different from other employers? Speaking with people who have interviewed or been offered roles but have not taken them is a good starting point – their feedback will help you build a deeper understanding of the perception of your business.

By looking both inwards and outwards, you build a picture of where the challenges lie in attracting and retaining the skills your business needs to succeed. However, it is worth noting that even once you have identified areas you could improve, there is no overnight fix – it takes time to establish trust within your teams and the wider market, but those businesses that have adopted this approach earlier in the game, are the ones who are reaping the benefits in a tight talent market. 

Tackling the skills shortage

It’s a bit of a juggling act and does require investment, but there are some ways to mitigate the impact of skills shortages on your business:

  • Develop your talent – while this takes time, it will pay dividends in the long run.
  • Hire talent externally to fill the gaps – it’s easier said than done.

Addressing the pressures on your team

The main way to overcome this is by being proactive with succession planning, rewards, and recognition. Make sure your team feel like they are rewarded fairly and conduct “stay interviews” to ensure you have your finger on the pulse.

Protecting against reduced output, growth & profitability.

Having the right people, in the right seats, at the right time will help mitigate this. Businesses are all about teams – if you build a high-performing team with talented individuals with the required skills, experience, and behaviours, your business can buck the trend and grow.  

If you’d like some help with diagnostics, improvement plans or general recruitment & development of talent, get in touch for a no-obligation chat with one of our consultants.

 

Written by Michael Hewitt


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How to be a good leader – from a good employee

I try to be a good employee. I care if my work is meeting expectations and I care that I am making an impact. And to be honest, I think that I do ok at it. I am by no means the best, and I still have a lot of learning to do, but I think for a gal who started working straight after her A-levels, I have done alright in my nearly decade-long career. 

I will admit, I am lucky and have always worked for companies that provided me with opportunities to grow. Even back in my first job, 18 and on the phones in a contact centre, I ended up managing a team of inbound sales advisors. Please don’t mistake this as some sort of not-so-subtle brag, because I was absolutely awful at this job. But it definitely taught me something about leadership – maybe even more now when I reflect as a slightly more grown-up version of myself. 

Even more lucky than that, I don’t think I have ever had a bad manager. I have worked with really great people. People who not only invested time in my development but brought me along with them and provided the space to really learn how to do the job well. Did we disagree at times? Of course. Maybe even p**s each other off a bit? I’d say almost certainly. But all in all, their support has been invaluable to my growth and I can honestly say I wouldn’t be where I am without them.  

So, across all these managers, what shared traits did they have? What did they do that made them so great? What about them helped keep me motivated and driven to do well? 

Trusting

This is probably one of the biggest things for me. Just trust people to get stuff done, and deal with those who aren’t. And when I say deal with, I do not mean reprimand – you need to support these people and get them to a place where they have the confidence to own their role. 

Trust goes both ways, so trusting them will help them trust you. And when your team have faith in you as a leader, you will get a hell of a lot more out of them. They will be more open with their ideas, collaborate with you to find solutions that work for everyone, and be motivated to work toward an overall goal. It also means they will be more open about their mistakes or challenges, helping you to solve these problems before they become a real threat to your business. 

Honest

Being honest is quite closely tied to trust, but I think it deserves its own section. Let’s be real – we can all tell when someone isn’t being 100% truthful. So trust me, you may think you’re being subtle, but there are raised eyebrows throughout your team when you say something a bit off. I know that sometimes certain topics can’t be discussed however, if you have established an honest and open relationship with your team, they will 100% understand that. It’s about saying what you mean (and doing what you say), admitting when you don’t know something or if you were wrong, giving honest feedback (good or bad), and sometimes just sympathising when things are a bit rubbish. 

Humble 

You are just a person – like every single one of your team. You may have a fantastic education or a stellar work history, but when push comes to shove, we are all just here to do a job. 

The best leaders are the ones who are ready and willing to help. The ones who acknowledge their teams’ contribution and don’t treat them like their underlings. It’s worth remembering that every cog has a place in the machine, and no matter how great you are, you would not be much of a leader without a team to follow you. 

Some people are quick to blame their teams when things go wrong, and even quicker to take the credit when they go right. Treat people how you expect to be treated – and don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty now and again!

While there may not be a one-size-fits-all approach to great leadership, these qualities form (in my opinion) the bedrock of strong leadership, regardless of the sector or industry. As you continue to grow and lead, embrace these qualities, stay open to learning, and cultivate a supportive and empowering environment for your team. By doing this, you will undoubtedly inspire and impact others, just as my managers have done for me throughout my career.

 

Written by Natasha Agnew


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Competing for talent in the world of hybrid working

The pandemic has brought about big changes in how we work, with remote and hybrid working becoming increasingly popular options for employees. A recent study found that over 80% of UK workers want to continue working from home at least one day a week. For those employers not offering hybrid work options, it is becoming increasingly challenging to compete for talent – especially for roles that have homeworking equivalents in the market.

But why do most employees prefer hybrid working?

One of the main reasons is that hybrid working provides employees with flexibility and the ability to maintain a better work-life balance. It allows them to choose when and where they work, which can lead to higher job satisfaction and overall well-being. By implementing hybrid working arrangements, employees can tap into the benefits of remote work while still maintaining some in-person collaboration for certain tasks.

And while we have seen energy bills rising, it can also be cheaper for employees to stay at home at least some of the time. Of course, this depends on the individual but could include savings on travel costs, childcare, and even that morning coffee routine. The reduced travel also creates more opportunities further afield, as they don’t have to make the long journey every day.

However, it’s not all sunshine and rainbows – remote working can blur the line between work and home life, making it harder to switch off and unwind. Additionally, some employees struggle with isolation and the lack of face-to-face interaction with colleagues.

Before the pandemic, I was self-employed and had already started working from home, but if I am honest, I missed the social interaction that came from working in a team. It was this that lead me to Corvus People. We work on a hybrid basis, which suits me from a work-life balance perspective, as juggling two young boys (and the newest addition, a cocker spaniel puppy) can require a *little* bit of flexibility.

So, what can employers do to make their office-based roles more competitive?

In the first instance, it is worth considering why this role needs to be full-time office-based. Not all roles are suitable for homeworking, but if similar jobs are available with a hybrid offering, you may want to highlight the reasons to potential candidates. If you aren’t sure why, then it could be time to think about offering hybrid working as a benefit for those who can and would avail of it.

If hybrid working isn’t possible, there are other ways to be flexible. You could consider offering flexible working hours, allowing employees to work around their commitments and avoid peak-hour commutes. This can be particularly appealing for employees with children or other caring responsibilities. From speaking with candidates, even just a bit of flexibility with start times and finish times can make all the difference.

Of course, you should consider your overall compensation and benefits package versus similar positions in the market. Why would top talent choose you? Hybrid working is widely considered a benefit amongst candidates, so offering a like-for-like on the rest of the package may not be enough.

In saying that, it’s not just about the perks – it’s also about creating a culture that values and supports employees. This means providing opportunities for career development, regular feedback, and recognition, and promoting a healthy work-life balance. Employers who can create a supportive and engaging workplace culture are more likely to attract and retain talented employees.

Competing with hybrid roles may feel like a challenge, but ultimately, it comes down to two things – being competitive in the market and knowing your unique value proposition. You may not have hybrid working, but perhaps you have an employee development programme which means all senior staff are recruited internally. Or maybe you have a state-of-the-art office space with free onsite parking. Take the time to understand what makes you different from other employers and communicate that with your potential hires, and you will be sure to attract candidates that are right for your business.

 

Written by Helen Cosgrove 


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An employers guide to creating a supportive workplace culture

Work can be stressful – from tight deadlines to endless emails, it’s no wonder so many employees feel overwhelmed and overworked. A 2020 Perkbox survey found that, of the 1,815 employed British adults polled, a staggering 79% commonly experience work-related stress. This is 20% higher than their 2018’s findings. As an employer, you have a responsibility to help your team build resilience and reduce workplace stress. Not only will this help improve their overall well-being, but it can also have a positive impact on your bottom line.

I recently carried out a LinkedIn poll on the causes of stress in the workplace, with 65% of respondents noting lack of communication as the leading cause – and it’s not hard to see why! When communication breaks down, misunderstandings occur, deadlines are missed, and tensions rise. As an employer, you should ensure that communication is clear, consistent, and open. This means setting expectations from the outset, being transparent about company goals and priorities, and encouraging feedback from your team.

An easy way to improve communication is by holding regular team meetings. Team meetings play a crucial role in fostering effective communication within the workplace. They provide a platform to exchange ideas, discuss progress, share updates, and collaborate on projects. By bringing team members together, meetings encourage open dialogue, facilitate problem-solving, and help build relationships among colleagues.

Team meetings are also a valuable tool for stress reduction – they provide an opportunity for employees to voice their concerns, seek support, and receive feedback, which in turn helps to alleviate anxiety and promote a positive work environment. By fostering clear and open lines of communication, team meetings contribute to a healthier and more productive workplace culture. Plus, it’s a great excuse to bring in some tasty treats and indulge in a little coffee and cake!

Communication leads nicely to psychological safety – after all, your employees won’t be open if they don’t feel comfortable doing so. If your team doesn’t feel safe to speak up and share their thoughts and ideas, this leads to feelings of anxiety and frustration. It also means you don’t hear what is truly going on in your business, making it hard to identify problems and provide solutions.

One way to do this is by encouraging your team to speak up and share their thoughts and ideas. This can be done in several ways, such as regular 1-to-1s, stay interviews or within team meetings. Let them know that their input is valued and appreciated. And when they do share their thoughts, make sure that you’re actively listening and engaging with them. This will help build trust and confidence and create a positive feedback loop.

Another leading cause of workplace stress is office politics. Let’s face it, no one enjoys navigating the murky waters of office politics. But unfortunately, it’s a reality in many workplaces. As an employer, it’s important to be aware of this and take steps to reduce the impact it has on your team.

One way to do this is by setting clear expectations and following through with consequences around behaviour and conduct. Make it clear that bullying, harassment, and discrimination will not be tolerated and act swiftly if you are faced with it. Encourage your team to speak up if they feel uncomfortable or witness any inappropriate behaviour. And make sure that you’re leading by example. If your team sees you treating everyone with respect and dignity, they are more likely to follow suit.

At the end of the day, reducing workplace stress and building resilience is not only good for your team’s well-being, but it’s also good for your bottom line. When your team feels supported, valued and safe, they’re more likely to be engaged, productive and loyal. Plus, a positive employee experience can help you attract and retain top talent, which is essential for the long-term success of your business.

So, next time you have any employees feeling overwhelmed by the demands of work, take a step back and think about what you can do to reduce this stress and help them build resilience – there’s always something you can do to improve the well-being of your team.

 

Written by Charlene Craig


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Boosting retention: 7 strategies every leader needs to know

As an HR Consultant, I have had extensive experience working with organisations of different sizes and industries. While all businesses face varying degrees of people problems, one of the most common challenges that leaders are facing today is staff engagement and retention. 

Engaged employees are more productive, innovative, and invested in the success of the company. In contrast, disengaged employees can negatively impact company culture, with lack of engagement being one of the leading causes of high turnover. 

Unfortunately, when it comes to boosting employee engagement, there is no quick fix – it often requires a multifaceted approach over a sustained period to truly make an impact. It requires buy-in from the senior team, with a commitment to fostering and promoting a healthy workplace culture – this may seem obvious, but it’s common for leaders to view these as a tick-box exercise rather than something that can add value to their business long-term. 

So, what are some of the best approaches to help promote staff engagement and retention? 

Promote Open Communication

Employees are more likely to feel engaged when they feel heard and valued. Encourage open communication channels between employees and management. Consider creating a system where employees can provide anonymous feedback to management. Take the feedback seriously and implement changes that benefit employees. For more on this topic, check out my recent blog on employee voice

Provide Opportunities for Growth

Employees want to feel like they are progressing in their careers. Offer professional development opportunities, such as training sessions or mentorship programmes. Encourage employees to attend conferences and workshops to improve their skills and network with other professionals.

Recognise and Reward Good Performance

Employees want to feel appreciated for their hard work. Create a culture of recognition by rewarding good performance. Celebrate individual and team achievements, such as hitting sales targets, completing projects, or going above and beyond their job duties. Consider providing incentives, such as bonuses, gift cards, or extra time off.

Foster a Positive Company Culture

Company culture can have a significant impact on employee engagement and retention. Foster a positive company culture by promoting work-life balance, encouraging team-building activities, and creating a supportive work environment. Encourage employees to participate in volunteer programs, team-building exercises, and other social activities.

Offer Competitive Compensation and Benefits

Salary and benefits are important factors in employee retention. Offer competitive compensation packages that are in line with industry standards. Consider offering additional benefits that will help make your employer brand stand out, such as health insurance or flexible working arrangements. These benefits can make a significant difference in attracting and retaining employees.

Provide a Clear Career Path

Employees want to know that they have a future with the company. Provide a clear career path that outlines potential opportunities for advancement within the company. Set goals with employees and provide regular feedback to help them achieve them. 

Encourage Work-Life Balance

Employees who feel overwhelmed and burnt out are more likely to leave the company. Encourage work-life balance by providing strategic initiatives where possible. This could be through hybrid working or support for working parents. Regardless of how this looks for your business, you should encourage employees to take time off when they need it and promote a culture where taking breaks and holidays is encouraged.

Staff engagement and retention are crucial to the success of any business. By promoting open communication, providing opportunities for growth and fostering a positive company culture, businesses can create a supportive and engaging work environment that encourages employees to stay and contribute to the company’s success. If you would like any support with implementing the above strategies, please get in touch. 

Written by Chris Mullan


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